BPH: features of products from cereals

Question

You advise against eating millet and wheat porridge, while doctors recommend all kinds of porridge. Could you justify your statement, please?

Answer

Well, I know this from my own experience. I have quite reasonable suspicion that some porridges made from cereals have very high level of gluten, which is not good for a person suffering from BPH (benign prostatic hyperplasia). Gluten means “glue” in Latin. It creates serious problems in blood circulation and, as a consequence, you have painful symptoms.

As for me, this kind of damage is stronger and more persistent than, for example, excessive consumption of animal protein in your daily diet. If your have some problems with the endocrine system and the vessels are not elastic, you may get the deterioration of urination for one or maybe two or three days after eating a bowl of “innocent” porridge. As you can see, it becomes impossible to overcome the illness (benign prostatic hyperplasia), when your diet includes products containing gluten.

If you suffer from BPH (benign prostatic hyperplasia), you should exclude not only millet and wheat porridge, but also oatmeal, corn and any assorted porridge from your menu. Round-grained rice, rice of paella and Arborio sorts are also prohibited (even those ones of the highest quality). As for barley, I ate it long ago and I think that it isn’t good for you too. One handy advice for you – if a products has sticky feel, don’t eat it.

I advise you to eat rice that doesn’t stick together after cooking, for example, long-grained basmati (also known as Thai rice), Jasmine (Asian rice), buckwheat, bulgur (east product, cereal from durum wheat).

These are my own observations. You won’t find anything similar. Perhaps your urologist meant vegetable porridges. Then, it makes sense. Indeed, you can eat almost every vegetable porridge (for example, pumpkin porridge) without any restrictions.  Gennady Plotyan

http://www.adenomaprostate.com/en/articles/7 – Link to page non-medicinal method of treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia “Living without BPH”.